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La Jeune Rue: The Latest Cultural and Culinary Initiative in Paris’ Marais

La-Jeune-Rue-Vertbois

Rue de Vertbois, Emma Stencil

Three quiet streets in ParisMarais neighborhood are the site for one of the most interesting projects of the year. The name Cédric Naudon, French entrepreneur and millionaire, was splashed all over the French press this spring with the announcement of his sensational initiative La Jeune Rue.

La Jeune Rue, Empty Street

La Jeune Rue, Isabel Miller-Bottome

Not much is known about this low-profile businessman who is said to have made his millions in real estate and finance in the United States. The Gatsby-esque aura surrounding Naudon is reinforced by his reticence in interviews, as well as the flamboyant decision to purchase 36 storefronts over the course of a year to realize his vision for La Jeune Rue, a project that is estimated to cost over 30 million.

La Jeune Rue, Buildings

La Jeune Rue, Isabel Miller-Bottome

La Jeune Rue is set to transform three neglected Parisian streets – Rue Volta, Rue du Vertbois, and Rue de Notre-Dame-de-Nazareth – into a mecca for bohemian-bourgeois shoppers in search of locally-sourced and artisanal products.

La Jeune Rue, rue de Vertbois and rue de Volta

Rue de Vertbois & Rue Volta, Emma Stencil

Naudon has spoken of La Jeune Rue as an act of love for his city. The name for the project is taken from a poem by Apollinaire: “Heres the young street and youre still a baby/ Dressed by your mother in blue and white only.” The initiative aspires to create a community of first-class shops and restaurants emphasizing French artisanal craftsmanship, ethically sourced organic products, and eco-friendly business methods.

La Jeune Rue, Ibaji Facade

Ibaji Restaurant, Emma Stencil

An astounding 36 boutiques, restaurants, concept stores, and traiteurs were scheduled to open doors this summer, but unforeseen delays brought the launch to a halt. After weeks of silence, the first of La Jeune Rues restaurants, the eclectic and welcoming Korean café-teahouse joint Ibaji, served its first lunch crowd and was an instant hit.

La Jeune Rue, Ibaji Cuisine

Ibaji Restaurant, Emma Stencil

Combining fresh ingredients, a carefully crafted gastronomic menu, and a quirky aesthetic, Ibaji is a break from the traditional Parisian brasseries and cafés in the neighborhood. This is where Parisians come to get their kimchee fix, with menu items ranging from traditional Bulgogi Dup-Bap and Dolsot Bibimbap plates (rice, marinated beef, fried egg, and vegetables) to the mouth-watering and original Bulgogi Sliders, with seasoned beef and spring onion nestled between two sesame buns.

La Jeune Rue, Ibaji Gimbap

Ibaji Restaurant, Emma Stencil

The reasonable lunch menu (19) includes a starter of seaweed and mussel soup as well as bowls of spicy kimchee. Dont leave Ibaji without tasting the green tea frozen yogurt sprinkled with toasted granola. The restaurant also offers quality artisanal green tea and coffee, as well as a hand-picked selection of wines, local beers, Korean soda, and spirits.

La Jeune Rue, Ibaji Kimchee and Banchan

Ibaji Restaurant, Emma Stencil

The buzzing atmosphere at this tiny restaurant, with its central community table and counter, make dining at Ibaji an original experience, but if youre looking for something a little more formal, try dinner across the street at Anahi. Pairing a stunning dining room by interior designer Maud Bury and an inspired Argentinian menu by Chef Osvaldo Lupis, the second restaurant by La Jeune Rue is sure to become a staple in Paris as well.

La Jeune Rue, Ibaji Inside

Ibaji Restaurant, Emma Stencil

The newest location opened by La Jeune Rue is the eye-pleasing Sicilian restaurant Pan, located a few blocks from the three-street hub on rue Martel. For new openings in the coming months, keep up with La Jeune Rue on their website and Facebook page. In the works are an artisanal bakery, cheese shop, juice bar, wine shop, crêperie, oyster bar, paper store, and, if you can believe it, even more.

La Jeune Rue, Anahi Facade

Anahi Restaurant, Emma Stencil

Ibaji – 13 rue  du Vertbois, 75003. Tel: +33 (0)1 42 71 67 81

Anahi – 49 rue Volta, 75003. Tel: +33 (0)1 48 87 88 24

Pan – 12 rue Martel, 75010. Tel: +33 (0)1 42 46 10 83

La Jeune Rue, Street

La Jeune Rue, Isabel Miller-Bottome

Related links:

  • While waiting for more openings at La Jeune Rue, check out the nearby cafés and concept stores like The Broken Arm and Café Pinson, both located in the Haut Marais.
  • Get your ethical fashion fix at the trendy Centre Commercial by the Canal St Martin.
  • Condé Nast Traveler calls La Jeune Rue “Paris’ Most Transformed Street in the Haut Marais.” Check out their article here.

Written by Emma Stencil for the HiP Paris Blog. Looking for a fabulous vacation rental in Paris, London, Provence, or Tuscany? Check out Haven in Paris.

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Written by Emma Brode

Emma BrodeEmma’s love for France began at the age of three when her aunt bought her an adorable gilet and skirt from Paris. Since then she’s jumped at every chance to explore Europe. She spends her weekdays studying (and tasting!) food and wine in Paris and travels on the weekends with her German husband. Check out @emmarosebrode on Instagram for her favorite restaurants in Paris and beyond.

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