homesubscribe to newsletterpinterestfacebooktwitterrssinstagram
Parisian livingrestaurant reviewstravelartseventsshoppingour Paris apartmentsfood
link to HiP blog home page
link to HiP blog home page
search
Paris apartments
About HiP
contactcontact
vacation rentals
special offers
ParisParis
ProvenceTuscany
Paris apartments
 
Paris vacation rentals
pinterestfacebooktwitterrssinstagram

Locavore Paris: Fall Market Shopping & The Perfect September Tart

I am a real foodie now. I have committed to buying locally and seasonally. So long sweet pineapples; see you sporadically. Most expats have their sentimental reasons that keep them in France. A perfect café crème, a favorite terrace, or unpasteurized cheese can easily outweigh all the persistence, courage, and patience it takes to build a life in Paris. Continue Reading »

Posted in HiP Recipes, Parisian Living | 10 Comments »

End of Summer Recipes: Making Homemade Jam in France

Cristina Lasarte

Remember the fable of the ant and the grasshopper? Should we “sing” all summer? Or should we be preparing for the colder months ahead? Summer is the time of sweet, sugary stone fruit… and what better way to capture summer’s bounty than preserving it with jams to last you through the long months of winter.

anshu_si & Isabelle @ Crumb

If you’re like me, you have always been intimidated at the prospect of making jams, simply because you didn’t know how. Of course, we have searched the internet for recipes, bought books, and timidly thought about asking advice from those who actually know how to make jams, because they have been doing it for years. Continue Reading »

Posted in Food, HiP Recipes | 7 Comments »

Chic French Nibbles: Purple Macarons With a Savory Twist

Cristina Lasarte is the voice behind the gorgeous blog From Buenos Aires to Paris. Her mouthwatering photography and playful recipes, inspired by her Argentinean heritage and her new life in France, keep us coming back to her blog again and again. Here, she shares her recipe for Blue Smoked Salmon Macarons, the perfect amuse-bouche for your next elegant get-together. Enjoy! – Geneviève


It was exactly my fourth post ever…  Those who had been following my blog right from the very first day (if I did have any followers to speak of then) saw a shy Argentinean blogger producing some mauve macarons, photographed in a ring box.

The photo was picked up by Foodgawker and before I had even really understood what blogging was about, the world was looking at my blog: Singapore, Alaska, Arkansas, Russia… One thousand clicks in two hours. That was back in 2009. You can still find the recipe here, and in Audrey Hepburn’s company here.

Savory macarons are not my invention. In fact, the “father” of modern macarons, Pierre Hermé, started playing with the idea of giving traditional sweet macarons a savory twist long ago.

One day, I thought of making something elegant… Something with salmon, and something black… Yes, black macarons!

I went to G. DeTout to buy black food coloring. Back home, I started adding tiny quantities of this coloring to my Italian meringue, and it started turning…mauve. Mauve? Another half coffee spoon… deeper mauve! I paused and wondered: should I continue adding color, or stop here? I hate it when macarons dye my tongue! And this shade of mauve was so beautiful… And it matched my poppy seeds perfectly! Yes, the match was sealed.

Today, my mauve salmon macarons have become a trademark of my Menu Malbec catering service. After all this time, I decided a new photo shoot was in order. After all, two years of blogging had improved my photography skills.

I have to admit that sometimes people look at me with a skeptical eye: “Salmon in a sweet macaron? Is the crust savory at least?” Until the first bite, when all doubts vanish!

The savory macarons are here to stay… Not only with salmon, but with foie gras now as well…who could think of something more appropriate for holiday parties? Chicissime! Continue Reading »

Posted in Food, HiP Recipes | 10 Comments »

Marjorie Taylor’s Asparagus Risotto and Market Day in Beaune

You might have noticed if you’ve been wandering the markets of France recently: asparagus are in season. Wonderful cook, teacher and friend of HiP Paris Marjorie Taylor, who runs the Cook’s Atelier in Burgundy, shares her yummy asparagus risotto recipe with us here, and throws in a few tips for your next weekend trip to Beaune on the way. We don’t know about you, but we can wait to try both! – Geneviève

To a food and wine lover, Beaune makes for a perfect day or weekend getaway when visiting Paris.  It is ideally located, just a couple hours from Paris via the TGV, and gives visitors a little taste of authentic France.   Beaune is a very picturesque, international little town that offers many possibilities for those interested in learning more about the food and wine of the region.  You can explore the small wine villages just outside Beaune and bike through the famous vineyards, wine tasting all along the way.

One of my favorite things to do on a bright spring morning in Burgundy is to visit a local market. You know spring is here when the season’s first wild leeks and artichokes appear at the market.  The air is perfumed with the smell of tiny Gariguette strawberries and the vendors’ stalls are filled with violet and white asparagus, wild leeks, fava beans, and spring peas.

The market days in Beaune are on Wednesday and Saturday.  Locals fill their market baskets to the brim before stopping at Le Parisian, a favorite local brasserie, for a leisurely coffee or glass of crémant before heading home.  On Saturdays, during the spring and summer months, there is a brocante in Place Carnot, the perfect place to find a vintage Madeleine pan, copper pots or French linens. Continue Reading »

Posted in Food, HiP Recipes | 7 Comments »

Meyer Lemon Curd from Dorie Greenspan’s Around My French Table

Dorie Greenspan is a francophile icon. She’s perhaps one of the most interesting women cooking French-inspired cuisine today and, having released her latest cookbook (Around My French Table) late last year, she’s also an inspiration in her own right. A part-time Paris resident, she focuses on sharing what real French people eat at home. We’re delighted to be able to share this post, which Shelby Larsson originally wrote for Eat Boutique. – Maggie

You may have noticed that we have all gone a bit nuts over citrus recently here on Eat Boutique. First it was Maggie’s Meyer Lemon liquor. Then Meagan shows up with these incredible looking Pomander Cupcakes. Can you imagine a better afternoon than hanging out with these two ladies around a kitchen table, sipping a homemade Meyer lemon cocktail and slowly unwrapping an orange, buttermilk and clove cupcake? With all these tart treats jumping off my screen, I just couldn’t resist the urge to add my own citrus creation.

Luckily, the perfect situation presented itself a few cold weekends ago. I was visiting my family up in Maine, doing what I typically do up there: cook, read, sleep, eat, repeat.  My mom, intrigued by Maggie’s Meyer Lemon Liquor, had purchased a half dozen Meyer lemons at the local grocery store so that she could see what all the fuss was about.  I knew immediately that I wanted to try making a batch of lemon curd with the Meyer lemons, and set off to find the perfect recipe.

After searching various websites and food blogs, I grew weary of my computer, cast it aside, and went outside to play on the frozen lake. When I came back inside, cold and sleepy, I snuggled into the couch and heaved my new Dorie Greenspan cookbook onto my stomach, balanced it up against my knees and flipped through those beautiful pages. As I read, I realized that Dorie had a great lemon curd recipe in there the whole time.

Around My French Table might be my new favorite cookbook. The photographs are beautiful and compelling: I want to jump right into each picture and dig deep into the chard-stuffed pork roast, moules marinières, and salted butter break-ups.  The recipes are simple and geared towards unfussy meals at home or with a crowd of friends. The dishes come not just from Paris, but also feature traditional food from the different regions of France: Normandy, Provence, the Alps, and more. Like American food, French food is often influenced by other countries, particularly North African nations (tagine, couscous, b’stilla), Spain (chicken basquaise), and Italy (osso buco). Dorie gives great ideas about how to present, serve and store the food, as well as often offering up a bonne idèe about possible variations.  Most of all, I appreciated how straight-forward and unpretentious these recipes are – French food often gets a bad rap for being over-the-top and complicated, but this is the food that the French cook at home. My kind of food.

(Seadam; Francescav)

Continue Reading »

Posted in Food, HiP Recipes | 8 Comments »

La Cuisine Cooking Classes in Paris: HIP Paris Makes French Apple Tarts

Tarte Tatin, Tarte Fine aux Pommes (Julien Hausherr)

Eating and Paris. No matter how much you might try to dissociate the two, a stay in Paris without its fill of delicious treats could be a holiday in any other northern European capital, albeit one with some pretty nice architecture.  Letting yourself be tempted by the window displays in patisseries and the cozy banquettes of corner brasseries is all part of the charm of living in Paris.

You won’t be blamed for spending your time here eating your way through neighborhood markets and various restaurant guidebooks, but you may find upon returning home to a routine of simpler meals (what, no Coq au Vin for dinner tonight, Mom?) you wish you had brought some of the mythical recipes back with you.

To answer the ever more popular dream of the food-blogger/cook/tourist, scores of great and not-so-great cooking schools have opened up in Paris to teach eager visitors la cuisine française. If you are not serious enough to book a semester at the Cordon Bleu, though, you may find yourself overwhelmed by the options out there. Lucky for you, Ariel and I recently tried out a class at “La Cuisine”, a wonderful cooking school geared towards visitors and locals that we feel confident recommending to anyone looking to delve a little deeper into the secrets of French cuisine.

La Cuisine: Ariel peeling an apple, Geneviève stirring the Crème Anglaise (Julien Hausherr)

Oliver and Jane started “La Cuisine” just over a year ago, and its popularity has already supported their move to a fantastic location right next to the Hotel de Ville. Tired with the demands of her banking job, Jane decided to drop it all, work her network, put together a group of serious culinary professionals and open a cooking school. With a soon-to-be degustation room and cellar, in addition to the two lovely kitchen/classroom spaces, La Cuisine is a great place to soak up a few recipes & tips in a welcoming environment.

On our recent visit, Ariel and I learned from the lovely Nathalie how to make the elusive Crème Anglaise. As side dishes to this queen of creams, we also learned how to make a perfect Tarte Fine aux Pommes and a traditional Tarte Tatin. Ariel has the scoop on the recipes below… – Geneviève

——-

La Cuisine: Crème Anglaise (Julien Hausherr)

Mmmmm, I could just live off of Crème Anglaise alone! I miss that sweet ambrosia when I’m back in the states, since Americans tend to prefer the frozen version as a garnish to our pies and cakes.

For someone like me, an abysmal cook who can’t even fry an egg, the idea of actually making Crème Anglaise from scratch was madness, something best left to professionals for fear of botching one of the complex intermediary steps.

Au contraire mon amie! After taking the class at La Cuisine, both Genevieve and I have been able to recreate the sweet sauce (to the amazement of our family and friends)!

Here are Nathalie’s foolproof steps for a perfect Crème Anglaise: Continue Reading »

Posted in HiP Recipes, Tours and Classes | 16 Comments »

Impressing the French: Baking For the In-Laws

Lindsey Tremuta, the author of the entertaining blog Lost in Cheeseland, offers up regular musings on her life as an American expat in France. Here, she shares a couple recipes with us: a zucchini cake with crunchy lemon glaze that held its own during lunch with the French in-laws and a mouth-watering iced lemon buttermilk poundcake.

Hipparis: Baking for the French In-LawsDelicious ingredients: the keys for success

When I first moved to France, cooking scrambled eggs and pasta were about the extent of my kitchen capabilities. Mr. Cheeseland was understandably perplexed how I was able to nourish myself before he came along. Well a change of scenery and a couple of years to really get settled was just the push I needed to start cooking. We generally share the cooking responsibilities but I do the baking. That is, I make attempts.

One of the first things I ever successfully produced was a whole wheat zucchini bread. At that time I was always trying to find ways to make desserts healthier which usually produced a bland final product. Once I accepted that I was really only denying myself an extraordinary pleasure, I went back to basics. Zucchini, banana, pumpkin and lemon loaves without cutting corners on sugar or butter. If you’re going to eat it, might as well make it good.

Hip Paris: Baking for the French In-LawsZucchini cake with crunchy lemon glaze

Every couple of months we get together with Mr. C’s parents and his sister for lunch, an occasion that usually translates to 5 hours of grazing and drinking. His sister is outstanding in the kitchen and always cooks up something inventive and filling – rarely traditional French dishes. That being said, she’s also known for her baking. Chocolate often makes an appearance in her desserts (if it isn’t the focus) and although it’s heavenly, I often feel unable to breathe or muster the energy to move out of my chair. It’s really an unpleasant situation. As a result, I started offering to bring the dessert to have a bit of control over how much and how heavy the end of the meal is. That hasn’t stopped her or my mother-in-law from making their own desserts thereby making the the problem I was trying to avoid even worse.

Continue Reading »

Posted in Food, HiP Recipes | 5 Comments »

Recipe Tip: A Decadently French Moelleux au Chocolat

This delicious recipe comes courtesy of new Hip Paris friend Cristina – cook, writer, photographer and blogger extraordinaire. Her mouth-watering blog, From Buenos Aires to Paris, grew from her desire to learn to cook like the French – which is something we can all relate to! For scrumptious recipes and inviting images all year long be sure to check out Christina’s delicious blog. Be sure to let all of us at HiP Paris know what you think of the moelleux once you have baked one!

Moelleux au Chocolat Paris Recipe

One of the things that first catches our foreign eye when we come to France, apart from the Eiffel Tower, is the moelleux au chocolat — that typical French cake, so simple, yet so decadent, moist, scrumptious …And, immediately, we come to the conclusion that such a treat must be archi-compliqué to make… It ‘s French after all !

Today, I am going to show you not only how to make a moelleux but to take it to haute-pâtisserie levels, by coating it with the most luscious mirror glaze, and to top it off, a wonderfully fresh array of berries…

What ? You believe you can’t make it ? Well, unlike most foodbloggers who admit having felt a passion for cooking since an early age, I spent all my life away from the kitchens, teaching at schools and university, until one day, destiny took me to France (Yes, we are puppets in the hands of God), and there, a new passion was born ! but since learning on my own was hard, I decided to train professionally both in Buenos Aires and in Paris : Ecole Alain Ducasse, Ecole Lenôtre, in Plaisir…internship with the famous Parisian pâtissier Gérard Mulot…

This cake is not hard to make, but the first secret to incredible taste and texture begins with top quality chocolate … here I used Vahrona  61% cacao (you can buy the 1kilo package at G. Detou – 58 rue Tiquetonne).  I would advise you chocolate no less than 55% cacao, but not too high either, since the cake might turn too bitter. Same holds good for the cocoa powder…this incredibly brilliant mirror glaze is impossible to achieve without good cocoa powder

Ok, let’s get working…here is the recipe…

Continue Reading »

Posted in Food, HiP Recipes | 5 Comments »

Christmas in France in SoHo: Culinary Workshops with Rosa Jackson & Paule Caillat

I spent Christmas of 2008 in Paris, strolling along the glittering boulevards, ducking in and out of specialty shops, sampling seasonal foods, and fueling myself with vin chaud. It was utterly magical, and while there’s no substitute for a real Christmas in France, Rosa Jackson and Paule Caillat managed to re-create the culinary splendor for a lucky few this December when they crossed the Atlantic to host a 2-day workshop at the Culinary Loft in New York.

Foodnetwork.com and Deliciousdays.comPhotos: Foodnetwork.com and Deliciousdays.com

The two sessions (“Christmas in Provence” and “Christmas in Paris”) entailed the preparation—and enthusiastic consumption—of a variety of traditional holiday foods from these two parts of France. I was lucky enough to be invited to the Provence workshop, where I learned how to knead, whisk and poach like a pro, all while enjoying the company of the group—replete with Francophiles and gourmands—that turned out for the workshop.

Continue Reading »

Posted in Food, HiP Recipes, Tours and Classes | 3 Comments »

Ode to Marrons Glacés

marronsPhotos: epiceriedecharles.fr and recette.cuisine.notrefamille.com

Text by Simone Blaser

This Christmas, we’re indulging in a holiday treat that is both delicious and oh-so-French: the marron glacé. That’s code for glazed chestnuts—gooey nuggets of pure holiday joy. When done wrong, they are overpoweringly saccharine; but at their best, they have a nutty and subtle sweetness so delicate and modest, it’s no wonder they gained popularity in Louis XIV’s court at Versailles. Continue Reading »

Posted in HiP Recipes | No Comments »