Bars

Enjoy Paris Like a Local This Summer 

by Verity McRae

Paris is almost back in full swing and Parisians are once again indulging in their favorite past times. However, while it may seem tempting to re-discover Paris by visiting renowned attractions, here are some great spots to get you off the beaten track to enjoy Paris like a local. 

1. Le Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature: a quick trip into the world of Wes Anderson 

Left: A picture at Le Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature with various golden framed paintings of animals on a plum velvet wall. Right: A picture at Le Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature, of a white room with various ornaments including a golden painting of a dog.
Top Left: @ernestorussoph / Top Right: @bastien_nvs / Above Left & Right: Le Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature

Hidden in the popular 3rd arrondissement is perhaps Paris’ most underrated museum: Le Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature. It holds one of the best taxidermy collections in the world, making it a must-see for any Wes Anderson fan. Situated in the limestone Guénégaud, simply jump off the busy streets and make your way through the museum’s exquisite rooms full of ancient trophies, priceless artworks, and exotic animals.

(The Museum is currently undergoing renovations and will open July 3rd to visitors)

2.  Saint-Ouen’s flea market: vintage gems

Left: A picture of vintage clothes piled high at Le Marché aux puces de Saint-Ouen in Paris. Right: A picture of vintage fashion magazines from the 1950's, 1940's and more at Le Marché aux puces de Saint-Ouen in Paris.
Above Left & Right: @ilariatramonti

Tucked away on the edge of the city’s northern border is one of the most unique shopping experiences in Paris. Le Marché aux puces de Saint-Ouen is a combination of 2,500 small shops spread across fifteen markets all in one location. From rare vinyls and vintage Chanel bags, to renaissance beds, and old-school McDonald’s toys, there is nothing you won’t find at Les Puces. Spend a few weekends sifting through antique collections of everything you do and do not need.

3. Studio 28: unwind at an art-house cinema 

Left: A picture of the building face of the cinema Studio 28 in Montmartre, Paris. Right: Right: A picture of the cinema inside Studio 28 in montmartre, with red velvet curtains and seats.
Above Left: @montmartre_artandlove / Above Right: Studio 28

Although many of us spent lockdown binging Netflix, there is nothing quite like watching a film on the big screen. Luckily, Paris is home to dozens of world-class and funky theaters that are back open for business. The perfect cinema to get you back into the Parisian film scene and feeling like you’ve stepped into the world of “Amélie” is Studio 28. Located on a quiet cobblestone street in the 18th arrondissement, this cinema first made its name when Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel premiered their surrealist film “L’Âge d’Or” inside its ritzy red velvet seated salles. Head here to escape the heat and engross yourself in an art-house film. 

4. Chez Plumeau: drinks in Montmartre 

Left: A picture of Café Chez Plumeau on Place du Calvaire in Montmartr, Paris. Picture includes people dining on its terrace on a sunny day. Right: A picture of a rail on a cobblestone street overlooking Paris in Montmartre.
Above Left: @le_pepp / Above Right: @devetpan

If you’re looking for a drink with a view, we suggest checking out Place du Calvaire in the charming Montmartre ‘hood’. You’ll find this petite terrasse just below the world-famous Place du Tertrenestled underneath picturesque trees with one of the most stunning views of the city. Enjoy a decently priced spritz here at Chez Plumeau or simply park up on a public bench and gaze at the magic of Paris from above.

5. Château de Monte-Cristo : an alternative to Château de Versailles 

Left: A picture of Château Monte-Cristo in Paris, with blue sky in the background, taken from a low angle. Right: A picture of a spiral staircase inside Château Monte-Cristo in Paris.
Above Left: Julien Chatelain / Above Right: @lauraloub

Looking for an under-the-radar château to make the most of a sunny day? Just an hour west of Paris by train is the former home of the legendary French author Alexandre Dumas. Château Monte-Cristo, named after his renowned novel The Count of Monte-Cristo, boasts whimsical grounds filled with grottos, waterfalls, and Dumas’ former writing studio located in the middle of a pond. At an 8€ entry price, this hidden gem makes for a perfect day trip out of the busy city.

Addresses 

Le Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature – 62 Rue des Archives, 75003 Paris

Le Marché aux puces de Saint-Ouen -99 Allée des Rosiers, 93400 Saint-Ouen

Studio 28 – 10 Rue Tholozé, 75018 Paris

Chez Plumeau – Place du Calvaire, 75018 Paris

Château de Monte-Cristo – Chemin du Haut des Ormes, 78560 Le Port-Marly

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Written by Verity McRae for HiP Paris. Looking to travel? Check out Haven In for a fabulous vacation rental in Paris, France or Italy. Looking to rent long-term or buy in France or Italy? Ask us! We can connect you to our trusted providers for amazing service and rates or click here. Looking to bring France home to you or to learn online or in person (when possible)? Check out new marketplace shop and experiences.

Written By

Verity McRae

Verity is a Kiwi expat and hobby writer currently living in Paris. Before moving to the other side of the world in 2020, she worked as a PR consultant at a corporate communications agency in New Zealand for three years. Later this year Verity will begin a masters degree in Paris in pursuit of an international career in communications. In her spare time, you can find Verity wandering in and out of Parisian bookshops, sat down with a coffee at her favourite cafe Loustic or going for scenic runs along the Seine. View Verity McRae's Website

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